Growing together: policy considerations for the African Continental Free Trade Area

The African Continental Free Trade Area could transform regional growth, with key focus on three policy dimensions, argue research fellows Sonali Chowdhry, Martina F. Ferracane and Rohit Ticku (Robert Schuman Centre). These dimensions are non-tariff barriers, the digital economy and improved government procurement policies.

European transport’s Cinderella

The EU explicitly promotes bicycling for the sake of health, climate and jobs. But as Policy Leader Fellow Daiva Repečkaitė notes, poorly monitored funding schemes and incompetent route planning can do more harm than good.

Making sense of Germany’s Ukraine policy

Why did Germany approve provision of German-made tanks for Ukraine’s defence only after months of pressure and downright bashing of Chancellor Scholz and his party, both at home and abroad? This torment, explains PhD researcher Marius Ghincea, stems from a contest over elementary foreign-policy principles, combined with the rhetorical coercion that is customary practice in democracies.

Scholars, paupers, artists, fighters: Black lives in Europe since 1500

This post introduces an exhibition at the EUI in February 2023 for Black History Month. History researcher and exhibition curator Daphné Budasz argues that learning about the diversity of Black life trajectories in Europe is a way to challenge White historical imagination.

European public goods are key to tackle the economic challenges of 2023

European policymakers will face four major challenges in 2023: stagflation and market fragmentation, and the green and digital transitions (in the face of the US Inflation Reduction Act). In this post, Marco Buti (European Commission) and Marcello Messori (Luiss) argue that increasing the supply of strategic European public goods is key to addressing these challenges.

Will support for Brexit become extinct?

In light of recent polling suggesting a substantial shift in opinion on Brexit, the EUI’s Joris Frese, Juho Härkönen and Simon Hix examine the extent to which this can be explained through ‘voter replacement’ – the phenomenon of older, Brexit-supporting voters passing away and younger, anti-Brexit voters entering the electorate.

Stopping stagflation in 2022

Europe’s current economic situation has striking parallels with the 1970s oil price shocks. In this post, Professor Waltraud Schelkle (Political and Social Sciences/Schuman Centre) explains why central banks are reluctant to fight inflation resolutely now: their fixation on asset markets as the metric for successful stabilisation.

The ‘Justice’-COP’s invisible stakeholders

Debates at COP27 remind us that intergenerational justice is gaining political salience – despite the concept’s elusive and contested meanings. In this post, Law PhD candidate Daniel Bertram summarises the recent revival of intergenerational claims in lawsuits around the globe and argues for an expanded view of future generations.

COP27: No adaptation if the risk isn’t perceived

At COP27, the world’s leaders are discussing the need to speed up climate action. In this post, Policy Leader Fellows Petra Krylova and Alejandro Saez Reale examine the association between people’s perceptions of climate change risks and good governance, using the global Climate Perceptions Index.