international relations


Brexit was a “Machiavellian Moment”

Michael Sanfey, a Visiting Fellow at the Robert Schuman Centre, writes that Brexit was a “Machiavellian Moment” in which Britain, confronting its “temporal finitude”, decided by a small but clear majority that the EU was not delivering stability across a range of important policy areas. Geopolitically, a Machiavellian analysis would suggest that Britain’s position post-Brexit has actually improved, given that EU is geopolitically weak and its recent moves to embrace “the language of power” are belated and likely to fail.

Will the European Political Community redraw the map of Europe?

The 44-state European Political Community (EPC), first convened in late 2022 to express unity and defiance against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, meets again on 1 June. In this post STG Executive Director Fabrizio Tassinari explains how this embryonic organisation might acquire real value.

In praise of reality, not realism: An answer to Mearsheimer

There is no justification for the atrocities committed by Russia against the people of Ukraine. This does not stop scholars from trying to explain Putin’s decision to invade. John Mearsheimer’s recent lecture at the EUI was one such attempt – which fails on multiple counts, the authors argue.

The EU Strategic Compass: Charting a course in stormy seas

The EU’s Strategic Compass for Security and Defence was approved in the midst of Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine. In this assessment of the Compass, Visiting Fellow Michael Sanfey underlines the challenges of internal coordination and external cooperation, and regrets the lack of clarity on the EU’s peaceful raison d’être.

Sovereignty, power and global governance

Sovereignty is one of the most important concepts in international relations, but its meaning is contested and not immutable. Against the backdrop of today’s military conflict in Ukraine, Robert Schuman Fellow Michael Sanfey explores the tensions between globalisation and sovereignty, and the UN’s ambiguous championing of the latter.

Is US–China cooperation on climate possible?

Despite the two rivals’ public commitment to cooperate on reducing carbon emissions, neither is in the position to act decisively or stay the course. In this post, Professor of Law and Governance Peter Drahos reviews the main political, economic and environmental constraints.