European Union


Brexit was a “Machiavellian Moment”

Michael Sanfey, a Visiting Fellow at the Robert Schuman Centre, writes that Brexit was a “Machiavellian Moment” in which Britain, confronting its “temporal finitude”, decided by a small but clear majority that the EU was not delivering stability across a range of important policy areas. Geopolitically, a Machiavellian analysis would suggest that Britain’s position post-Brexit has actually improved, given that EU is geopolitically weak and its recent moves to embrace “the language of power” are belated and likely to fail.

Will the European Political Community redraw the map of Europe?

The 44-state European Political Community (EPC), first convened in late 2022 to express unity and defiance against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, meets again on 1 June. In this post STG Executive Director Fabrizio Tassinari explains how this embryonic organisation might acquire real value.

European public goods are key to tackle the economic challenges of 2023

European policymakers will face four major challenges in 2023: stagflation and market fragmentation, and the green and digital transitions (in the face of the US Inflation Reduction Act). In this post, Marco Buti (European Commission) and Marcello Messori (Luiss) argue that increasing the supply of strategic European public goods is key to addressing these challenges.

Will support for Brexit become extinct?

In light of recent polling suggesting a substantial shift in opinion on Brexit, the EUI’s Joris Frese, Juho Härkönen and Simon Hix examine the extent to which this can be explained through ‘voter replacement’ – the phenomenon of older, Brexit-supporting voters passing away and younger, anti-Brexit voters entering the electorate.

AI in the courtroom and judicial independence: An EU perspective

The promised benefits of AI-assisted courts pose myriad challenges to the fundamental principle of judicial independence, explains CIVICA Visiting Scholar Giulia Gentile. Judicial data stored or processed by foreign providers, or liability regimes covering judges and technicians are just some of the devilish details.

The EU Treaty reform challenge: Is there a winning package?

The authors conducted a 16-country survey to identify what reforms matter most to EU citizens. They found support for existing policies on climate change, immigration and corporation tax, and some support for more institutional integration. Decision-making by unanimity is unpopular.

How unified are Europeans’ views on the war in Ukraine?

Analysing a survey in five EU countries, Research Fellows Ioana-Elena Oana and Alexandru Moise find Hungarians and Poles to have the widest disagreement about EU membership for Ukraine and about ending energy dependence on Russia.

The EU Strategic Compass: Charting a course in stormy seas

The EU’s Strategic Compass for Security and Defence was approved in the midst of Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine. In this assessment of the Compass, Visiting Fellow Michael Sanfey underlines the challenges of internal coordination and external cooperation, and regrets the lack of clarity on the EU’s peaceful raison d’être.

The young generation needs an idea of Europe

In this post, law researcher Marc Steiert argues that the EU needs to go beyond study exchanges and the Erasmus programme, if young people are to shape their future as a European one.