COVID-19


Can the WHO’s study on COVID-19 underpin legal action against China?

Is there a legal case against China for insufficiently warning the World Health Organization in the early days of COVID-19? EUI Researcher Mike Videler examines information-sharing obligations under international law, the potential of a WHO-led study that got off the ground this week, and some possible complications.

Pandemic politics in turbulent times

In Mongolia, frustrations with pandemic policy have come to a head, leading the Prime Minister to resign. STG Policy Fellow Bayaraa Jigmiddash takes a closer look.

Vaccine diplomacy—the best first move for the Biden administration to reset relationships

President-elect Joe Biden has plenty of diplomatic issues to tackle in his approaching tenure as the 46th President of the United States. While some tout the importance of immediate steps to signify America’s renewed embrace of “values and democracy”, Nicholas Noe suggests starting with a more pragmatic and inclusive approach: “vaccine diplomacy”.

Pandemics and the future of rights mobilisation

COVID-19 has forced derogations from and limitations to rights at every level. However, there are some populations for which the pandemic has generated rights victories previously considered out of reach. EUI Professor of Public International Law Neha Jain puts the spotlight on one such vulnerable population––prisoners––to explore how COVID-19 has helped change the discourse on the rights of detainees to ignite prospects for prison reform.

The COVID-19 welfare wake-up call

The coronavirus pandemic hit when the world was still reeling from the Great Recession, delivering a serious blow to economies everywhere. Will European welfare states be able to absorb this new shock? Anton Hemerijck and Robin Huguenot-Noel urge welfare states to consider long-term objectives for greater resilience to short-term crises.