COVID-19


COVID-19: Spur or restraint to citizen engagement?

Initially the COVID-19 crisis appeared to put a halt to street protests and other forms of citizen engagement in Europe. But the pandemic has also increased the value of solidarity, motivating involvement on behalf of people at risk. EUI research fellow Ioana-Elena Oana and colleagues have explored the ways in which perceived threats and ideological predispositions have shaped how and when people mobilise.

Who should pay for the COVID-19 crisis? Learning from war-time experiences

Progressive taxes could be one positive outcome of Covid-19, as people demand fiscal fairness following a crisis. SPS researcher Jakob Frizell explores the parallels with war-time fiscal politics and the constraints on governments today to meet such demands. Taxing the rich, he concludes, is still the wise choice.

Do not pause vaccinating

COVID-19 is a dangerous and deadly disease. Economists Peter Hansen and David Levine argue that stopping or delaying vaccination with the AstraZeneca and J&J vaccines out of an “abundance of caution” is not worth the risk.

When collegiality matters… or of Von der Leyen’s loneliness

World leaders are acting quickly to confront the COVID emergency, sometimes at the expense of established rules and procedures. RSC research associate Maria Patrin examines the fall-out earlier this month when European Commission President Ursula van der Leyen bypassed the Commission’s principle of collegiality in decision-making.

Can the WHO’s study on COVID-19 underpin legal action against China?

Is there a legal case against China for insufficiently warning the World Health Organization in the early days of COVID-19? EUI Researcher Mike Videler examines information-sharing obligations under international law, the potential of a WHO-led study that got off the ground this week, and some possible complications.