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How unified are Europeans’ views on the war in Ukraine?

Analysing a survey in five EU countries, Research Fellows Ioana-Elena Oana and Alexandru Moise find Hungarians and Poles to have the widest disagreement about EU membership for Ukraine and about ending energy dependence on Russia.

The EU Strategic Compass: Charting a course in stormy seas

The EU’s Strategic Compass for Security and Defence was approved in the midst of Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine. In this assessment of the Compass, Visiting Fellow Michael Sanfey underlines the challenges of internal coordination and external cooperation, and regrets the lack of clarity on the EU’s peaceful raison d’être.

How authoritorian governments are enlisting platforms for state censorship

Facebook and other platforms have been criticised for complying with governments that stifle dissent, under various legal guises. Policy Leader Fellow Gideon Sarpong argues that upping investments in field staff and in technology, particularly in the Global South, can do much to prevent harmful content while protecting freedom of speech and of the press.

Mobilising for euthanasia in Italy: Courts and the political agenda

Taking the example of civil-society mobilisation to legalise euthanasia, law researcher Mario Pagano shows how powerful courts can be in bringing sensitive issues to the political agenda, and how effective litigation can be when the time is ripe for political institutions to act.

Did we solve the caseload problem? Russia’s exit from the European Court of Human Rights

Russia’s withdrawal from the Council of Europe will deprive the European Court of Human Rights of some of its funding, even as the caseload relating to Russia continues to grow. Law Researcher Helga Molbæk-Steensig explains the key role the Court could play in transitional justice following the war in Ukraine and calls on member states to up their contributions.

The war in Ukraine, food crises and global uncertainties

Agronomist and Research Fellow Michele Nori describes the likely effects of disrupted cereal exports from Russia and Ukraine, particularly for dependent regions in Africa and the Middle East. Local control of agricultural systems and food supplies, he argues, remains key for coping with growing uncertainties.

Sovereignty, power and global governance

Sovereignty is one of the most important concepts in international relations, but its meaning is contested and not immutable. Against the backdrop of today’s military conflict in Ukraine, Robert Schuman Fellow Michael Sanfey explores the tensions between globalisation and sovereignty, and the UN’s ambiguous championing of the latter.