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Shipwrecking democracy and the rule of law

Leading up to the 2020 elections in the United States, Professor of Law Martin Scheinin illustrates how weaknesses in the United States constitutional framework, especially with regard to the judiciary, threaten democracy and the rule of law.

The Challenges of the Afghan Peace Talks

Although the Intra-Afghan peace talks are a significant step towards a resolution of a forty-year-long war, challenges remain as violence continues and both sides not only have drastically opposing views but also face internal divisions.

A funding strategy for EU own resources reform

The European Council is favourable to introducing new own resources to finance the EU budget, but finding a feasible and palatable approach is not easy. In this article, economists Clemens Fuest and Jean Pisani-Ferry recommend putting the revenue from ETS allowances at the centre of the reform of the EU own resources system.

 

The COVID-19 welfare wake-up call

The coronavirus pandemic hit when the world was still reeling from the Great Recession, delivering a serious blow to economies everywhere. Will European welfare states be able to absorb this new shock? Anton Hemerijck and Robin Huguenot-Noel urge welfare states to consider long-term objectives for greater resilience to short-term crises.

Will Russia intervene in Belarus?

Russian intervention is possible, but at this point very unlikely. Much depends on the next steps of the protesters, the Belarusian regime, and major Western states.

Surrogacy: Time for a self-sufficiency approach?

Brought into high relief by the COVID-19 pandemic, unregulated commercial surrogacy generates risk and damage to families, children, and mothers. In this article, Law researcher Sylvie Armstrong argues that a self-sufficiency approach in Europe, where commercial surrogacy is widely banned, is the best strategy available for protecting the parties involved.

Colonial memory and the social role of history

In the momentum of the Black Lives Matter protests, cities around the world have been challenged to remove commemorative statues recalling their colonial or slaveholding pasts. EUI history researcher Daphné Budasz examines these controversies through a reflection on commemoration, national identity and the social role of history.

Human Rights Due Diligence: Making it mandatory – and effective

Nearly 10 years ago, the UN first articulated a business responsibility to respect human rights in their supply chains. In this article, School of Transnational Governance Policy Leader Fellow Martin Curley argues that going forwards, civil society, especially trade unions, should play a much greater role in defining how this responsibility is fulfilled, especially at the international level.